Wednesday, February 22, 2012

My DNA Admixture Results Are In!

Image courtesy of Getfreeimage.com

I am sure many of you have been waiting for a follow up on my post from a couple weeks ago, called  My Thoughts About My Pending DNA Results. As I had mentioned in that article, I used a company called African Ancestry to have my DNA Admixture tested. This test provides you with a percentage breakdown of what your ancestral make-up is. Typically after 6 weeks you receive your results, however, the company had a sale in December for this particular test and I believe that they had a tremendous response from that. Subsequently my results took a little longer. I did call to see what the hold up was and I have to say the company has wonderful customer service over the phone. They are real people and you can tell they truly care about the service they are providing. Well anyway, I received the results last night and I have to say I am thrilled but not for the reasons I thought I would be thrilled for. I wanted to take this test to either prove or disprove my family's claims of Native American ancestry. To put it simply, to gain some clarity on genetically who I am. When I think of clarity, I think of an image I took while on vacation on Cape Cod last year. Here it is.

I have clarity now.



So without further ado.


No Native American here folks! Ha.
So I'd like to take this time to apologize to the Tuscaroran and Cherokee Nations for misrepresenting myself.

In conclusion I thought I should run a segment I found on Youtube that pretty much sums up everything I just went through. It is from African American Lives 2 by Henry Louis Gates.




20 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing your results! I enjoyed the video too.

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  2. Is that all they send you? What test do you need to get done to find out specific origins?

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  3. Hi Debra. The results come via email. That is page one of the info they send in an attached PDF. They do also send along some Supplemental Information to explain Test accuracy, limitations and how they test to see if you fall within each subgroup. Admixture testing looks at DNA that you inherit from both your parents. To find out your specific origins you have to do a Maternal DNA or a Paternal DNA test. Men carry an X and Y chromosome so they can swab for both tests. Woman have to have someone take the test who shares the same Y DNA as their father. (So father, brother, your uncle from you father's side of the family etc)

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  4. But woman can swab to take the test to find their Maternal roots. Hope that helps.

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  5. It's so exciting getting the results, isn't it! I did mine through 23&me and they were pretty general too.

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  6. It was exciting getting them. Of course now I want to take the other tests to find out where my roots take me in Africa. Have to save up some money though.

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  7. I did both Maternal & Paternal tests through Ancestry 4 years ago. Very interesting results via my Mom's Mexican-American side.

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  8. I need to have this done, also, have the Indian stories. Thank you for sharing.

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  9. This is a great post. I , too, have heard of the ancestor with the "long hair (down to the knees), that was really quiet". My personal DNA research (what little I've done), points to only 3% maternal, but I'm still researching. My paternal roots go back to 1720 Virginia (so far), so continuing on (with my father). Thanks again, for sharing. (Wow! Claudio Saunt was a former professor!) Thanks for including the video, too.

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  10. Patrick, I am curious about your Mom's Mexican American side too. Please share, If you feel comfortable. Linda and Nadia --Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  11. This is a fascinating post Andrea. The video is excellent. I'm Australian and years ago a friend was saying how she was adopted and her white parents explained her dark colouring was because of Indian blood (not Native American.. but Indian Indian :-) ... She later discovered there was no Indian blood but Australian Aboriginal Ancestry. I understand that this was not uncommon with people trying to hide their Aboriginality just as some also tried to hide "the stain" of Convict Ancestry. That sure has changed now and is seen as "a badge of honour".
    As an aside... I wonder if we could possibly be related through the Kellehers of County Clare, Ireland? My GGGrandmother came to Australia in 1855 - name: Susan Kelleher.
    I'm going to enjoy reading through your blog. Cheers, Catherine

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    1. Thanks Catherine. I have to say my mouth dropped open when I saw that your 2nd great grandmother came from County Clare, Ireland. That's where my husband's family line comes from, so I wouldn't be surprised if you were a distant cousin. It is indeed a small world we live in these days.

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  12. I've had this longing to discover my "Roots" for quite some time. I recently told my wife that I wanted to have the same tests done for both my maternal and paternal sides of the family. Your post here sealed the deal for me. I will have these tests completed by year end. Thanks

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    1. I am glad that my post was the added push to get you to try DNA testing. Happy discoveries :)

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  13. Hi,Andrea. Africanancestry.com recently brought myDNAmix back but I don't know about doing it myself since it's $199 while 23andme is $99 (speaking of 23andme,I and some family members entered our emails to be notified of "roots in to the future" on October 1,2011, 23andme ended it in December of 2011 but never got back with us. Even though it's down to $99 now I still wish we could get like a discount to get it lower since we entered our emails months in advance but were never notified). But any one African American doing 23andme will get a 1 to 2% Native American/East Asian result. They should know it's most likely not true Native American ancestry.

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  14. Great Post! But you might just want to try having chromosome dna, it would be really interesting!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by. Your comment is noted.

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  15. I got my results and it showed no Native American dna I knew something was missing my grandma did not make up a story about her grand mother being Native American so I downloaded my raw data and went the genmatch.com ran it through 4 different test and I found it along with Eastern Asia, Siberian, American Indian, Gujarati, NW Africa, Basque, Boloch. Mozabite, Mediterranean and West African as well as Eastern and Western European,By doing this I began to see my Ancestors in a different light so many have gotten me to this point and good, bad or indifferent I embrace them all!

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    1. Thanks for your comment. Since this post I have tested again with 23andme and the result with them came back that I had .7 percent Native American and East Asian Ancestry. So I am back to believing there is tiny weeny bit in there. :)

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  16. Late to the party, but I watched African American lives and took note when Gates pointed out that most African Americans do not have native ancestry. As a result, I discounted my mother's stories (my mother has been known to embellish) and believed that I had no Native ancestry. However, I took an admixture test from another company and discovered that I have 12% Native ancestry. I was shocked. I've been attempting to determine my sub-Saharan African origins through African Ancestry. I have tested my own maternal DNA, I found Berber ancestry. I had my cousin tested to determine my father's maternal ancestry (my father's deceased) and found haplogroup B, which is of Native origin. I yet to find my sub-Saharan African origins, but surprisingly, this journal has revealed ancestry I was unaware of.

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