Monday, June 18, 2012

The Results: I'm What?!!

Isn't it always the case in genealogy that once something is revealed there's more questions that need to be answered. Well without further ado, here's a screen shot of my AncestryDNA results.

Screenshot of my DNA results page on Ancestry.com


Hmmm. Now the 70% West African matches up perfectly with the result from my first admixture test through AfricanAncestry. If you missed the results from that test from earlier in the year, here's the link to that post My DNA Admixture Results Are In!  In my head I already had it figured that most of my European ancestry if not all was going to be from England and Ireland. My paternal grandfather was from Barbados so I thought immediately, west African and English. My mother's people I thought had possible Irish ancestry due to the white families that they were associated with during slavery. My DNA from the British Isles came out to be 10%. Okay, I thought that would be higher...moving on.

According to the oral history I had been given regarding my Whitney family line, I thought there should be a splash of Portuguese up in here. Nope! No Portuguese for you! (A la the Soup Nazi on Seinfeld if you don't know what I'm referring to,YouTube it.) No Native American Ancestry again, although 2% of my DNA did come back uncertain (It's a stretch, I know but there's still a shot. LOL! I have to laugh at myself for not letting this go.)

Then there's that little matter of the 11% Finnish/Volga Ural and 7% Scandinavian.

I had to read through the rest of the information provided on my DNA results page to find out that Finnish/Volga-Ural refers to the areas of modern day Finland and Western Russia.
Scandinavian for Ancestry.com's DNA results refers to modern day Norway, Denmark, and Sweden.

Alrighty then. I guess I have some more research to do. LOL!

12 comments:

  1. i just received my results today as well (well i had my mother tested so i could differentiate between my parents lines)...anywho my graph was not quite as colorful as yours was but surprising all the same with 69% west african and 28% british isles (didn't think that percentage would be that high)...at any rate i wish ancestry had more samples to compare against because i would like for my results to be narrowed down a bit.

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    1. ots i googled "admixture results" and your blog came up...so glad to have found it!

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    2. I am so glad you came across my blog. This whole DNA thing is pretty amazing to me. When I was a child it was never in my wildest dreams an idea that I would have the ability to trace back to where in Africa or where in the other parts of the world my ancestors came from. Amazing times we live in. I too wish ancestry had more samples but I believe that over time as they test more and more people, they may be able to further specify where certain parts of our DNA come from. We'll see. Thanks for checking out my blog!

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  2. Maybe the Scandinavian/finnish DNA came from Vikings visiting the British Isles back in the day.

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    1. You're probably right about this. I've been doing some more reading on DNA testing since I received my results and this indeed maybe the case.

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  3. This is all so interesting! I knew that both of my Dad's parents came from Sweden and my mom's heritage was English and German. I was surprised to find I had 60% Scandinavian, NO English, 19% Central European, 13% Finnish Volga Ural and 8% unknown (I'm still hoping my grandmother's story about "a little Native American" was true too...) At first I wondered if there was a Scandinavian milkman in my ancestors' past, but I too came to the conclusion that the Vikings had more of an impact on Great Britain than I was giving them credit for. This Finnish Volga Ural ancestry is a mystery, though. With 13% I should find it just a few generations back, but so far I have not had any luck, and I'm into the 1600's for most lines... This stuff just wraps you up... Great blog, by the way!

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  4. Hi Mindy! You have a great blog too. You are so right that this stuff just wraps you up. LOL!

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  5. My family hails from Cape Verde, a former Portuguese colony. With my brown skin, I just knew my results would show a majority African with some Portuguese genes. Well imagine my surprise when my results showed almost 70% Tuscan Italian genes and 30% African! They should warn to at least have a glass or two of wine before looking at the results.
    Sure enough I found people in my tree named Angelo, Cecilia and Leandra and surnames like De Senna and Ingargiola.

    I love your blog!

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    1. Thanks so much for your comments and for reading. Yes you are right about the "glass of wine" warning. :) Too funny. That's pretty interesting your results.

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  6. Just doing a random search on Uralic peoples and history, and came across your site. I have not done a DNA test myself, but I am curious and will someday. Here is a link about general Uralic peoples history, pretty extensive if you are interested: http://uralica.com/earlyfin.htm
    Basically, Sweden, Russia, and others ruled Uralics for centuries and encroached on their territories as many were assimilated. Finns served in the Swedish army for years, so there may have been a union of a Swede and Finn, and a descendant emigrated to America. Where I live, near Philly, Swedes first settled the area in the 1600s, before the English, and also in northern Delaware. So though most people think of later emigrations to the Midwest by Scandinavians, it is possible someone came to the East Coast in the early days of the colonies and ended up as part of your tree. Also, I think Viking dna was more likely in Scotland and Ireland than England, whose people also often came as servants, enlisted or conscripted in the British armed forces, or to escape repression.

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    1. Thanks for the link and the information. I will take a look at the link. Also, thanks for stopping by.

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  7. The Delaware Finns of Colonial America
    There are today at least 25 million descendants of the Swedes and Finns of the Delaware. At least half of these, perhaps more, have one or more Delaware Finns in their family tree.
    http://goo.gl/LmgDmY

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